David helvarg the storm this time

David Helvarg sends a dispatch from the hurricane-ravaged South By Grist staff on Oct 4, David Helvarg is president of the Blue Frontier Campaignwhich originally published this article. He is also author of the forthcoming, revised Blue Frontier: The smell of New Orleans is mostly not of dead bodies, but of a dead city. The smell you often encounter is like dried cow pies and mildew, with a strong chemical aftertaste.

David helvarg the storm this time

There was a complete failure in terms of precautionary actions, preparation and response. The National Hurricane Center gave 72 hours warning and the Coast Guard surged in behind the storm to do more than 6, flood-water rescues during four days of helicopter flying.

A lot of rooftops on the first day, more balconies on the second. We were just hoisting and fueling. At the opposite end of the competency scale, executive agency decision-makers at the Department of Homeland Security and FEMA left New Orleans and the Gulf without any other federal support for more than 96 hours, resulting in unnecessary deaths and hardship.

Clearly the Louisiana National Guard was not up to the task of dealing with more than a million environmental refugees and victims in the state.

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Although there is plenty of fault to be found at the local and state level, those with the greatest available resources ought to be held to the highest standards of accountability.

Albaugh brought his former college buddy Michael Brown into the agency after Brown was put out to pasture as a long-time commissioner with the International Arabian Horse Association. Like Brown, five of the eight top officials at FEMA had no previous disaster-management experience, though they were well connected politically.

After punching his ticket for two years, Albaugh resigned to become a lobbyist for high-end clients including Halliburton and the Shaw Group, major post-Katrina government contractors.

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Mike Brown became the new head of FEMA, assuring that there would be someone left behind to sign the contracts. The on-the-ground results of cronyism and myopia were shocking even to the eyes of a hardened reporter. Urban Flood Plain I arrive in Baton Rouge with a planeload of relief workers, FEMA functionaries and crew cut contractors, all working their cell phones and blackberries.

A police spokesperson assures listeners there are still 20 to 30 roadblocks around New Orleans and 11, guardsmen in the city.

The mayor wants to open the city back up to residents but the approach of Hurricane Rita has forced him to postpone his plan. Around the New Orleans airport in Jefferson Parish, I begin to see box stores, warehouses and motels with their roofs ripped off or caved in, downed trees and broken street signs, house roofs covered in blue tarps and high-rises with glass windows popped out like broken eyes.

I hit a traffic jam and follow an SUV across the median strip to an exit where I stop to take a picture of a small office complex with its second story front and roof gone.

I talk to a carpet-store owner removing samples. He helps me locate where we are on a map. I get a call from a contact at the New Orleans Aquarium. They lost most of their fish when the pumps failed but managed to evacuate the penguins and sea otters to Monterey.

I get on a wide boulevard that leads to a roadblock where a police officer checks my press identification. I drive into Lakeview, one of the large sections of the city that sat underwater for two weeks and will likely have to be bulldozed.

There are trees and power poles down, electric lines hanging, metal sheets and street signs on mud-caked pavement, smashed cars, boats on sidewalks and torn-open houses, all colored in sepia tones of gray and brown. Unable to drive far in the debris-chocked streets, I get out of my car, half expecting the sweet, rotting smell of death.

Fine yellow dust starts rising up from under my boots and infiltrating the car. The I exit is barricaded, forcing me north again. I do a U-turn at a major roadblock and get chased down by some angry cops. The French Quarter is still intact with even a few bars open for soldiers, FBI agents and fire fighters.

On Canal Street, it looks like a Woodstock for first responders with Red Cross and media satellite trucks, tents and RVs pulled up on the central streetcar median by the Sheraton. Red-bereted troops from the 82nd Airborne cruise by in open-sided trucks, M-4s at the ready in case the undead should appear at sunset.

Uptown, some boats lie in the middle of the street, along with cars crushed by a falling wall and a pharmacy trashed by looters.

David helvarg the storm this time

Further on are the smashed homes and muddied boulevards and still-flooded underpasses and cemeteries, abandoned cars and broken levees of an eerily hollow city. Of course, the U. Commission on Ocean Policy that Bush appointed had highlighted the risk of the levees failing in its final report in the fall of Brandon Coronado Summary 1 Summary of David Helvarg’s “The Storm This Time” In “The Storm This Time” (), David Helving shares his experiences while traveling the Gulf Coasts aftermath of Hurricane Katrina as a journalist and environmental activist%(4).

Sep 18,  · Best Answer: David Helvarg, THE STORM THIS TIME Three weeks after Hurricane Katrina, an environmentalist tours New Orleans and the Gulf Coast to Status: Resolved. Brandon Coronado Summary 1 Summary of David Helvarg’s “The Storm This Time” In “The Storm This Time” (), David Helving shares his experiences while traveling the Gulf Coasts aftermath of Hurricane Katrina as a journalist and environmental activist%(4). DAVID HELVARG is president of the Washington-based Blue Frontier Campaign and a contributor to E's climate change book Feeling the Heat. A version of this story originally appeared in Multinational Monitor.

"David Helvarg The Storm This Time" Essays and Research Papers David Helvarg The Storm This Time Kate Chopin’s “the Storm ” analysis on division significance The short story “the storm ” is a story of a women’s sexuality and the love of the character Calixta and her partner Alcee.

DAVID HELVARG is president of the Washington-based Blue Frontier Campaign and a contributor to E's climate change book Feeling the Heat. A version of this story originally appeared in Multinational Monitor.

David helvarg the storm this time

"David Helvarg The Storm This Time" Essays and Research Papers David Helvarg The Storm This Time Kate Chopin’s “the Storm ” analysis on division significance The short story “the storm ” is a story of a women’s sexuality and the love of the character Calixta and her partner Alcee.

“Without sensory stimulation, we sink into a less-than-human state.†Helvarg and Didion are well versed in the art of descriptive writing. While both essays engage all five senses equally in the way that we, as readers, experience sights, sounds, smells, and taste as if uniquely a part.

DAVID HELVARG is president of the Washington-based Blue Frontier Campaign and a contributor to E's climate change book Feeling the Heat. A version of this story originally appeared in Multinational Monitor.

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