Learning competencies

Competencies and Learning Outcomes by David Gosselin, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Competencies and learning outcomes are two related educational terms that can create confusion. Competencies and outcomes can be written to describe the learning gained by students in individual courses course outcomes or for the program as a whole program outcomes. We will follow the lead of Hartel and Foegeding and use the following working definitions: A general statement that describes the desired knowledge, skills, and behaviors of a student graduating from a program or completing a course.

Learning competencies

General Education Learning Competencies In fulfilling the mission of the college, all students in degree programs must take general education courses within seven competencies: Students enrolled in bachelor degree programs are required to take five additional competencies: After completing a communications course, a student will be able to: Develop the ability to communicate effectively through listening skills, feedback, and reflection.

Show proficiency in computer skills Learning competencies utilizing the latest developments in communication media through Learning competencies use of technological resources. Demonstrate the ability to be an active listener, interpret non-verbal cues, and tailor communication to various audiences.

Communications courses fulfilling this competency will be assessed with a common rubric evaluating the delivery of an oral presentation. Computer Literacy CL Computer literacy courses prepare students to use technology for communication and to function effectively in a variety of settings.

After completing a computer literacy course, a student will be able to: Demonstrate the effects and outcomes of appropriate use of technology in a global community. Analyze and apply computer concepts to show mastery of technological knowledge. Computer literacy courses fulfilling this competency will be assessed with the completion of a skills-based final exam.

Cultural CU Cultural courses help students to develop an understanding of the underlying values of a culture, recognize differences in relationships among cultures, and foster a respect for various cultural perspectives.

After completing a cultural course, a student will be able to: Engage in discussions centered on one or more of the following: Respond to a variety of materials, from academic and literary texts to works of art and music, in either written or oral form.

Research, interpret, analyze, and evaluate the cultural context of a variety of materials. Cultural courses fulfilling this competency will be assessed with a common rubric evaluating an academic assignment i. Mathematics MATH Mathematics courses develop problem-solving skills and give students the opportunity to apply mathematics concepts to real world problems.

After completing a mathematics course, a student will be able to: Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies and mathematical procedures to interpret and solve problems. Use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.

Mathematics courses fulfilling this competency will be assessed with the completion of a skills-based final exam. After completing a science course, a student will be able to: Formulate clear, concise, and relevant scientific questions.

Identify, gather, and assess scientific information.

Learning competencies

Demonstrate understanding of scientific terminology, principles, and concepts as well as the ability to use scientific inquiry to solve problems.

Science courses fulfilling this competency will be assessed through common core questions on a final exam to demonstrate the ability to connect and interpret scientific concepts.

These courses focus on theory and relevant application regarding social, cultural, and cross-cultural norms and sanctions. After completing a social science course, a student will be able to: Analyze the importance of human behavior and cultural forces on society.

Examine social, political, economic, cultural, and cross-cultural factors and the impact of these forces upon the individual and society and how they affect human behavior and the mental processes. Social science courses fulfilling this competency will be assessed with a common rubric evaluating an academic assignment i.Competency-based learning refers to systems of instruction, assessment, grading, and academic reporting that are based on students demonstrating that they have learned the knowledge and skills they are expected to learn as they progress through their education.

Learning Competencies In fulfilling the mission of the college, all students in degree programs must take general education courses within seven competencies: Communications, Computer Literacy, Cultural, Mathematics, .

Learning competencies

Education competencies for teachers and school leaders. These education competencies represent many of the attributes, behaviors, areas of knowledge, skills, and abilities required for successful job performance in education.

Education competencies: Learning on the fly. This competency is one in a set of complete functional and behavioral qualities that, when fully realized, can help lead to professional success.

The Social and Emotional Learning Competencies guide is designed to provide educators and out-of-school-time youth service professionals with the essentials for . Objectives, competencies, and outcomes can be written to describe the learning gained by students in individual courses (course outcomes) or for the program as a whole (programmatic outcomes).

Competencies vs Learning Outcomes